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    Human nature … Thomas Cole’s Catskill Mountain House (1845-1847). Photograph: Francis G Mayer/Corbis
When the painter Thomas Cole headed out of New York into the upriver wilderness of the Catskills in the early 19th century, he discovered a new world of colour. Forests in the American fall were new territory for landscape art – a brave new world of reds and purples. Cole, who founded the American style of Romantic landscape that was to be called the Hudson River School, put the chromatic spectacle of America’s fall leaves into the history of painting with Falls of the Kaaterskill and Shroon Mountain.
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    Human nature … Thomas Cole’s Catskill Mountain House (1845-1847). Photograph: Francis G Mayer/Corbis

    When the painter Thomas Cole headed out of New York into the upriver wilderness of the Catskills in the early 19th century, he discovered a new world of colour. Forests in the American fall were new territory for landscape art – a brave new world of reds and purples. Cole, who founded the American style of Romantic landscape that was to be called the Hudson River School, put the chromatic spectacle of America’s fall leaves into the history of painting with Falls of the Kaaterskill and Shroon Mountain.

    Read more here

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    The story of British art
From the earliest evocative stone structures at Skara Brae and Stonehenge to the disturbing 20th-century portraits by Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, the scope and sweep of British art tells a truly spectacular story about our isles. Through painting, sculpture, architecture and much more, immerse yourself in the best of critic Jonathan Jones’s epic survey of the artworks that have made us who we are.

    The story of British art

    From the earliest evocative stone structures at Skara Brae and Stonehenge to the disturbing 20th-century portraits by Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, the scope and sweep of British art tells a truly spectacular story about our isles. Through painting, sculpture, architecture and much more, immerse yourself in the best of critic Jonathan Jones’s epic survey of the artworks that have made us who we are.

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    Jenny Saville interview


    "I’m not anti conceptual art. I don’t think painting must be revived, exactly. Art reflects life, and our lives are full of algorithms, so a lot of people are going to want to make art that’s like an algorithm. But my language is painting, and painting is the opposite of that. There’s something primal about it. It’s innate, the need to make marks. That’s why, when you’re a child, you scribble."

    Jenny Saville talks to Rachel Cooke

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