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    The story of British art
From the earliest evocative stone structures at Skara Brae and Stonehenge to the disturbing 20th-century portraits by Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, the scope and sweep of British art tells a truly spectacular story about our isles. Through painting, sculpture, architecture and much more, immerse yourself in the best of critic Jonathan Jones’s epic survey of the artworks that have made us who we are.

    The story of British art

    From the earliest evocative stone structures at Skara Brae and Stonehenge to the disturbing 20th-century portraits by Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, the scope and sweep of British art tells a truly spectacular story about our isles. Through painting, sculpture, architecture and much more, immerse yourself in the best of critic Jonathan Jones’s epic survey of the artworks that have made us who we are.

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    Jonathan Jones explains why he thinks Lucian Freud should have his own gallery:

Freud was never a deliberately attention-grabbing artist, but the warm public response to his art since his death offers heartening evidence that true quality transcends fashion, publicity, and the white noise of cultural chatter.
I believe Britain should open a museum in his honour. I really mean it. There needs to be a Freud gallery that permanently preserves his work and provides future generations with a repository of his achievements. There is an obvious problem – I’ll come to that – but also an imperative to make this happen.

    Jonathan Jones explains why he thinks Lucian Freud should have his own gallery:

    Freud was never a deliberately attention-grabbing artist, but the warm public response to his art since his death offers heartening evidence that true quality transcends fashion, publicity, and the white noise of cultural chatter.

    I believe Britain should open a museum in his honour. I really mean it. There needs to be a Freud gallery that permanently preserves his work and provides future generations with a repository of his achievements. There is an obvious problem – I’ll come to that – but also an imperative to make this happen.

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